Fields in Trinity may be turned into microforests

TWO ‘microforests’ could be created on agricultural land in Trinity, if plans are approved.

This St Saviour-owned field in Trinity could be planted with native species to create a fast-growing microforest Picture: DAVID FERGUSON
This St Saviour-owned field in Trinity could be planted with native species to create a fast-growing microforest Picture: DAVID FERGUSON

The two fields – on Rue des Croix and Rue de la Blanche Pierre, the latter of which is owned by St Saviour – have been selected as part of a £60,000 Jersey Electricity-led scheme.

Those behind the idea say the ‘densely planted, native miniature forests’ are usually about the size of two tennis courts, grow rapidly and absorb carbon.

St Saviour Constable Sadie Le Sueur-Rennard said the parish owned at least two suitable pieces of land in Trinity.

‘The JEC got in touch with every parish about offsetting the carbon footprint and we have a field on the opposite side of Victoria Village that we have put forward. We are planning to put a little path in there which would go through to the [Eric Young] Orchid Foundation.

‘I am meeting two executives from the foundation to show them what we have got and it is being surveyed by the powers-that-be, who tell me that there is lots of wildlife in there,’ she said.

Attached to the planning application is a letter from the Jersey Royal Company, which has expressed its support for the St Saviour-owned field application.

Ian Le Brun, the business’ land manager, says the area is of little use to them. ‘Unfortunately, due to the lower quality of soil, stone content and topography of said field, we welcome the idea and wish the parish well in wanting to better utilise said area as it has become an unfeasible [area] for Jersey Royal production under the current regime of the “perfect produce” scenario,’ he said.

‘The plan to plant something which will aid our environment without seeming out of place in the location proposed is honestly the best idea, project and situation that could happen... if they are not allowed to proceed and manage [the land] accordingly the area will eventually be abandoned and left to fend for itself,’ he added.

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