Drivers using mobiles could lose their licences

Using a mobile phone while driving
Motorists face fines ranging from £400 to £1,000 if they are caught driving and making or taking a phone call at the same time. The Magistrate also has the power to disqualify them under the Road Traffic (Jersey) Law 1956 for up to three months.

MOTORISTS are being warned they risk losing their licence if they are caught using a mobile phone.

Magistrate Bridget Shaw said she wanted every driver in the Island to know that the court has the power to ban people from the roads if they are found to have driven while holding a phone.

And she warned that it was a penalty the court was prepared to impose, adding: ‘Removal of a driving licence can have a significant effect on someone’s job and their social life.’

Mrs Shaw issued the warning during the case of a 30-year-old man accused of the offence. During the hearing, Mrs Shaw told the two Centeniers who were present to tell their honorary colleagues that when dealing with motorists accused of driving while holding a mobile phone they should be mindful that disqualification was a sentencing option.

 

 

 

 

 

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Comments for: "Drivers using mobiles could lose their licences"

Finding Me:Mo

This is bizarre, the reporting states that the case has been adjourned until 7th March because the defending Advocate stated that the accused was using a hands free device. Is the Magistrate threatening imprisonment for using such a device , if so this would be the most draconian penalty for such a device outside of 'self professed Caliphate'.

Finding Me:Mo

Of course I meant disqualification not imprisonment , and I realise ducking stools and stocks are not in the Magistrates gift anymore.

karaoke joe

This Magistrate loves the power she wields . More so against drivers.

tony.t.1.

change the word "could" into "will" then i will believe it....clampdown on these idiots on the road.

Realist

Communication technology is now part of every day life and is here to stay. Yes, it creates a diversion on concentration even whilst walking, but short of banning the use of mobile phones altogether, it is entirely stupid to ban holding a mobile even when switched off or on hands free in a vehicle.

C Le Verdic

In recent years the car manufacturers have eroded any respect for anti distraction regulations by introducing multi-function dashboard displays which by now are probably capable of giving the driver facebook, twitter, you tube and anything else.

This technology helps sell particular models of car so that makes it OK in the commercial and entertainment led world we live in now.

It won't stop there. People are so addicted to their smartphones that they expect to use them anywhere all the time. Cars will become adapted to make life easier for phone and internet users and being in motion will not present an obstacle. After all, they put ash trays and cigar lighters in cars long ago to satisfy a previous fad.

There are too many commercial interests at stake to start blocking the use of phones and making voice and text calls are just the beginning of what people want to use their phones for nowadays.

If a number of people have to die in order to keep our freedoms c'est la vie, rather like the Great War.

The problem will eventually be solved by the cars all driving themselves. The change over period could be interesting!

Steve-o

Any deaths yet from this problem....it would be good if the same enthusiasm by our protectors was levied at booze fags and junk food and todays soft wobbly inactive kids.

Maverick

Many well documented cases in the UK and abroad where people have been killed by distracted drivers using mobile devices.

None directly attributed to this in Jersey, as yet. Maybe the situation should be ignored until a few fatalities have been tallied up before doing anything about it?!

Sotte Voce

Same with cycling on pavements, wait for a fatality before any action occurs.