Saying farewell to a popular minister and proud Jerseyman

FORMER Home Affairs Minister Len Norman, who died earlier this month aged 73, was laid to rest in his home parish of St Clement yesterday.

Honorary police officers form a guard of honour as the hearse arrives at St Clement's Church. Len Picture: DAVID FERGUSON. (31072670)
Honorary police officers form a guard of honour as the hearse arrives at St Clement's Church. Len Picture: DAVID FERGUSON. (31072670)

Family, friends, politicians and dignitaries gathered to pay their respects to a much-loved States Member who had served the Island for almost four decades.

Members of the parish’s honorary police lined up on either side of the road as the hearse carrying Mr Norman’s coffin arrived at St Clement’s Church.

Public figures and politicians past and present attended the service, including the Bailiff, Timothy Le Cocq, Attorney General Mark Temple, Chief Minister John Le Fondré, Deputy Chief Minister Lyndon Farnham and External Relations Minister Ian Gorst.

Ex-Senator Paul Routier and former Constables Ken Vibert and John Gallichan also attended.

States Members and representatives from the emergency services attended including Chief Fire Officer Paul Brown (background). Picture: DAVID FERGUSON. (31072676)

Mr Norman was first elected as a Deputy for St Clement in 1983 and remained in the position until he was elected Senator in 1996. He became St Clement Constable in 2008 – a position he held until his death.

During his time in the States he also served as President of the Education Committee, President of the Housing Committee, President of the Social Security Committee and chairman of the Privileges and Procedures Committee, among other roles. At the time of his death he was Jersey’s longest-serving States Member.

A minute’s silence was held at this month’s States sitting for Mr Norman and former Environment Minister Freddie Cohen, who died in May at the age of 63.

Len Norman. Picture: ROB CURRIE (31076126)

At the sitting, Mr Le Cocq paid tribute to Mr Norman, calling him a ‘proud Jerseyman’ who had trademark wit.

‘He was popular because he was loyal, respectful and placed the Island’s best interests at the forefront of all he did,’ said Mr Le Cocq.

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