Homeless man who shouted racist abuse to be monitored

A DRUNKEN homeless man who shouted racist abuse at the proprietor of an Indian restaurant is going to have to keep returning to court to prove he can stay out of trouble.

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Repeat offender Christopher Henry Hall (44), shouted insults such as you ‘f****** P*** b******’ at the restaurateur as the man was trying to stop Hall disturbing two female diners, the court heard.

The offences were committed when Hall went into Café Spice in Kensington Place at about 10.30 pm on 4 September.

Hall pleaded guilty ‘to using threatening or abusive words likely to cause alarm or distress’ and breaching a ban on him entering licensed premises.

Centenier Philip Coffey said Hall had said that ‘he was going to smash up the restaurant’ and asked the proprietor for a cigarette, which was refused.

When he approached two females to ask for a cigarette the proprietor went to protect them from Hall. As a result Hall became aggressive and asked the restaurateur to go outside and fight him before launching into the tirade of racist abuse.

The Centenier said that the incident was witnessed by another member of staff, who called the police.

When questioned by police, Hall said he had been drinking in Parade Gardens all day with friends. The defendant said he was drunk and recalled being racially abusive to the owner. However, Hall said he was not a racist and it was nothing personal.

Advocate James Bell, defending, pleaded with the court not to send the defendant to prison. He argued that there ‘was a danger of a revolving door syndrome to La Moye’, as Hall had regularly been sent to custody. The advocate said Hall regretted the way he spoke to the proprietor and just after the outburst apologised.

Relief Magistrate Sarah Fitz agreed it was worth giving Hall a chance to show that he could stay out of trouble. She adjourned the case until Friday 14 September.

An immediate appointment was made with the Probation Service and Hall said he would go straight there and also attend every appointment he was given.

Mrs Fitz told the defendant that if after a couple of weeks of monitoring he was able to show he could behave, then a non-custodial penalty would be imposed. However, she said that if he got drunk and misbehaved, he would be sent to prison.

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